Page 34 - Nov/Dec 18 MMOPA
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 SAFETY
PA46 Accidents in the Last 12 Months
     A Meridian accident that was precipitated by a loss of power after takeoff.
g g o o e e s s d d o ow w n n . . T T h h e e r r e e s s u u l l t t
is that the pilot, in a
stressful situation, will miss
important inputs/clues, and thus
prioritize actions poorly as a result. This happens to all pilots – military, commercial, and private.
There are two ways to combat this problem. First,
the more we train, the more correct responses become ingrained and second nature. That helps when we have
to devote brainpower to an urgent problem – our "muscle memory" can take over for the routine tasks as we focus elsewhere. In addition, we can recognize when this situation develops, and when under stress, find assistance
    Figure 1: Accident Count vs Accident Rate
20
15
10
5
0
10
to help us. That assistance can come from a flying companion, from checklists, from ATC (or best, from
 9 all three). The Norway incident is a good example of the pilot using
8 help from ATC to deal with multiple
7
6
simultaneous problems – he landed gear-up in a controlled manner in IMC conditions, and all on board walked away.
5 Another of our lectures at
4
3
Convention talked about inflight loss of control, which is the leading cause of fatal accidents in all sectors of aviation, including airlines, the
2 military and general aviation. Indeed,
 1
four out of the past five fatal accidents in the PA-46 (dating back to 2015) are directly attributable to inflight loss of control. I discussed two of these fatal accidents during our Safety Review,
  34 MMOPA MAGAZINE   NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2018
number of accidents
AccidentRate per 100 airframes
2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984
































































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